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P750-A 7 Steps to a Healthy Heart

47 A1C test: A type of blood test used to determine whether blood sugar is in a healthy range. Angina: A condition in which pain, squeezing or tightness in the chest is caused by the heart muscle not getting enough blood. Aspirin: A compound commonly used to thin the blood or treat pain or inflammation. Atherosclerosis: The narrowing and hardening of the arteries, caused by the buildup of cholesterol and other substances inside the artery walls. Atrial fibrillation: A condition in which the heart beats too fast or irregularly. Blood pressure: The amount of force blood exerts against the walls of your blood vessels. Cardiovascular disease: A disease of the heart or blood vessels. Cholesterol: A waxy, fat-like substance your body uses to make cells and other important functions. Complications: Harmful conditions caused by a disease. Coronary heart disease: Disease of the coronary arteries, which carry blood to the heart. Diabetes: A condition in which your body doesn’t make enough insulin to handle the sugar in the blood, or the body can’t use the insulin it makes, or both. Endorphins: Chemicals found in the brain that raise the pain threshold and promote a general feeling of well-being. Fasting plasma glucose test: A blood test that shows how much glucose (sugar) is in your blood. It can help diagnose diabetes. Glucose: A type of sugar that your body converts food into so your cells can use it for energy. HDL cholesterol: The “good” type of cholesterol, which helps the blood do away with excess LDL cholesterol. High blood pressure: A condition in which the blood flowing through your vessels is pushing too hard against the vessel walls. Also called hypertension. Hypertension: High blood pressure. Immunization: The use of vaccines (shots) to prevent serious diseases. Impaired glucose tolerance: A condition in which blood sugar is higher than normal, but not high enough to diagnose diabetes. Insulin: A chemical in the blood that helps the cells use the sugar they need for energy. LDL cholesterol: The “bad” type of cholesterol, which can deposit on the insides of your artery walls and cause a blockage. Lipoprotein profile: A blood test usually done after you’ve fasted for 8-10 hours that tells how much total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides are in your blood. Monounsaturated fat: A healthier type of dietary fat that may help lower your “bad” cholesterol level. Peripheral vascular disease: A reduction in blood flow to the extremities, most often to the legs and feet, usually caused by atherosclerosis. Prehypertension: Blood pressure that is higher than normal, but not high enough to be called high blood pressure (hypertension). Polyunsaturated fat: A healthier type of dietary fat that may help lower your “bad” cholesterol level. Saturated fat: A “bad” type of dietary fat you get from some types of food. Saturated fat raises the level of “bad” cholesterol in the blood. Stroke: A “brain attack,” where blood flow to the brain is suddenly interrupted. T-cell: A type of cell found in the blood and lymph in the body that organizes and carries out the body’s response to infection or malignancy. Trans-fats: A type of dietary fat that raises your “bad” cholesterol level. Triglycerides: A type of fat found in your blood. Glossary


P750-A 7 Steps to a Healthy Heart
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