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Your Guide to Adult Vaccination

PLAY VIDEO Adult Vaccines (CDC) The value of a vaccination record Your vaccination record (sometimes called your immunization record) provides a history of all the vaccines you received as a child and adult. This record may be required for certain jobs, travel abroad, or school registration. Unfortunately, there is no national organization that maintains vaccination records. The records that exist are the ones you or your parents were given when the vaccines were administered and the ones in the medical record of the doctor or clinic where the vaccines were given. Talk with your healthcare provider about the best options to make sure you are up-todate on vaccines. If you need official copies of vaccination records, or if you need to update your personal records, there are several places you can look: ■■ Ask parents or other caregivers if they have records of your childhood immunizations. ■■ Try looking through baby books or other saved documents from your childhood. ■■ Check with your high school and/or college health services for dates of any immunizations. Keep in mind that generally records are kept only for 1-2 years after students leave the system. ■■ Check with previous employers (including the military) that may have required immunizations. ■■ Check with your doctor or public health clinic. Keep in mind that vaccination records are maintained at doctor’s offices for a limited number of years. ■■ Contact your state’s health department. Some states have registries (Immunization Information Systems) that include adult vaccines. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention INFORMATION SERIES FOR ADULTS Vaccines Know What You Need ALL adults need vaccines to protect their health against common diseases that can be serious. There are four things to consider in determining which vaccines are recommended for you: 1. Vaccines every adult needs 2. Your age 3. Your health conditions, lifestyle, or job 4. International travel Talk to your healthcare professional at your next visit about which vaccines are right for you! 1. Vaccines every adult needs: Influenza (flu) WHO? All adults, including pregnant women during any trimester HOW OFTEN? Every flu season Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough) (Tdap) Tetanus and diphtheria (Td) WHO? All adults who have never received the Tdap vaccine and pregnant women HOW OFTEN? Everyone needs Tdap one time, no matter when you got your last tetanus (Td) vaccine. Pregnant women need a Tdap dose during every pregnancy. Td vaccine, to protect against tetanus and diphtheria, is needed every 10 years. 2. Vaccines you may need based on your age: Human papillomavirus (HPV) Recommended if you haven’t received the full 3-shot series WHO? Females age 26 or younger Males age 21 or younger Males age 26 or younger who have weakened immune systems or HIV, or have sex with men HOW OFTEN? One time series of three doses Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR)* Recommended as a catch up if you didn’t receive as a child WHO? Adults born in the United States in 1957 or later who have not received MMR vaccine, or who had lab tests that showed they are not immune to measles, mumps, and rubella HOW OFTEN? One time for most adults; however certain people like college students, international travelers, or healthcare professionals, should get two doses. Pneumococcal (pneumonia, meningitis) WHO? Adults 65 or older HOW OFTEN? Two pneumococcal vaccines are recommended. Get one dose of PCV13 (conjugate vaccine) followed by one dose of PPSV23 (polysaccharide vaccine), ideally 6-12 months later. Shingles (Zoster) WHO? Adults 60 or older HOW OFTEN? One time Varicella (chickenpox)* Recommended as a catch up if you didn’t receive as a child WHO? Adults born in the United States in 1980 or later who never had two doses of the vaccine or never had chickenpox HOW OFTEN? One time series of two doses *Live vaccines should not be given to pregnant women or people who have a very weakened immune system. That includes people with a CD4 count less than 200. DON’T WAIT. VACCINATE! Vaccines: Know What You Need Download/print this PDF My Adult Vaccination Record Take this card with you when you visit your healthcare provider. They can help you keep it up-to-date. Name: Birthdate: Your Guide to ADULT VACCINATION What You Need to Know About Protecting Your Health Brought to you as a public health service from the Association of Black Cardiologists. Vaccine Date Given Healthcare Provider/Clinic Next Dose Due Seasonal flu Tdap Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Whooping Cough) HPV Human Papillomavirus Pneumococcal Zoster Shingles MMR Measles, Mumps, Rubella Meningococcal Varicella Chickenpox Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hib Haemophilus influenza type b Other My Adult Vaccination Record Download/print this PDF


Your Guide to Adult Vaccination
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