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Your Guide to Adult Vaccination

In 2010, 63.5% of whites aged 65 and older had ever received the pneumonia vaccine, while only 46.2% of blacks and 39% of Hispanics had ever received the vaccine. Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health Vaccines and Pregnancy Being up-to-date on routine adult vaccines will help protect you and your child if you’re planning on becoming pregnant. A mother’s immunity is passed along to her baby during pregnancy and helps protect him or her during the first few months of life. While pregnant, it’s important to have the seasonal flu vaccine. Having the flu while pregnant can lead to complications, and even hospitalization. Getting the Tdap vaccine is also recommended, ideally between 27 and 36 weeks of pregnancy. You can also receive routine vaccines right after giving birth, even if you’re There are many diseases than can be prevented with vaccine. The CDC lists the following as vaccine-preventable diseases: ■■ Anthrax ■■ Cervical Cancer ■■ Diphtheria ■■ Hepatitis A ■■ Hepatitis B ■■ Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) ■■ Human Papillomavirus (HPV) ■■ H1N1 Flu
(Swine Flu) ■■ Influenza (Seasonal Flu) ■■ Japanese Encephalitis (JE) ■■ Lyme Disease ■■ Measles ■■ Meningococcal ■■ Monkeypox ■■ Mumps ■■ Pertussis (Whooping Cough) ■■ Pneumococcal ■■ Poliomyelitis (Polio) ■■ Rabies ■■ Rotavirus ■■ Rubella (German Measles) ■■ Shingles (Herpes Zoster) ■■ Smallpox ■■ Tetanus (Lockjaw) ■■ Tuberculosis ■■ Typhoid Fever ■■ Varicella (Chickenpox) ■■ Yellow Fever breastfeeding. For more information about vaccines and pregnancy, visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines/adults/rec-vac/pregnant.html.


Your Guide to Adult Vaccination
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